Scooby and Shaggy find a violin case filled with counterfeit money. The gang's search for clues to this mystery leads them to a puppet theater--and a sinister puppet master.

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(story), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Nicole Jaffe ...
Velma (voice)
...
Shaggy (voice)
Don Messick ...
Scooby Doo (voice)
Vic Perrin ...
Pietro / Puppet Master (voice)
...
(voice) (credit only)
...
Viking Puppet / Pirate Puppet (voice)
Jean Vander Pyl ...
(voice) (credit only)
...
Fred (voice)
Stefanianna Christopherson ...
Daphne (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Emanuela Fallini ...
Rosalinda Galli ...
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Storyline

Scooby and Shaggy see a car drop a violin case full of money, but while Shaggy calls the others and Scooby is distracted, the case and money are stolen. The kids decide the money must have been counterfeit, and when they find a marionette puppet control on the ground near where Shaggy and Scooby left the money, the kids head over to the local theatre where a puppet troupe is currently performing. Written by Spirit

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Details

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Release Date:

8 November 1969 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

When Scooby is inspecting the female dog puppet from the car that dropped the violin case, you don't see her strings attached. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Shaggy: Say, Scooby, kind of a spooky night, huh?
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Entertaining and atmospheric enough if lacking oomph
15 July 2016 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

'Scooby Doo Where are You' was the first Scooby Doo incarnation, and to me it's still the best.

Admittedly, "The Backstage Rage" wasn't a favourite as a kid and it still isn't now, but it has a lot going for it still. It is agreed that the villain, creepy costume and laugh aside (both of which help to add to the creepiness of the episode in general), is one of the weaker ones of the series.

Even as a kid, the villain's general lack of interesting personality and that his reveal is the second most obvious (even for a show admittedly with a fair few obvious reveals, "Mine Your Own Business" and "Never Ape an Ape Man" also fit into this category) of the whole show, after the Witch Doctor in "Decoy for a Dognapper" (not helped by it being a case of too few suspects and the person involved being the only one with means and opportunity) disappointed somewhat. His come and go and too fleeting appearances, often rather samey, and underused interaction with the gang diminished the impact too.

However, "The Backstage Rage" has much to enjoy. The animation is lively, atmospheric, lushly coloured and nicely drawn as always, the setting is effectively one of the most atmospheric as well. The music adds to the impact the atmosphere creates, and it is very difficult to resist the classic theme song, along with the opening credits where it is so fun spotting and recognising the villains, that is one of the most iconic in animation.

Despite the villain being lacking, "The Backstage Rage" does still have a creepy atmosphere, helped by the appearance and laugh of the villain (that one wishes was matched by a personality to match) and the setting. The puppets are incredibly cool too, especially the Viking and barbarian. As always with 'Scooby Doo Where Are You', "The Backstage Rage" is entertaining, nothing here is among the funniest of the series but Shaggy and Scooby's rapport, the trying of the outfits and the bit with the Jack-in-the-Box still tickle the funny bone more than effectively.

The final trap is one of the most creative, and the dialogue is easy to understand and ranges from amusing to very, very funny, Velma's playing around with words being just as funny as anything to do with Shaggy and Scooby. The gang still make an impression, especially predictably Shaggy and Scooby and one cannot go wrong with the great-all-round voice acting either (Don Messick and Casey Kasem being definitive as Scooby and Shaggy, and one cannot imagine Frank Welker being replaced at some point in the future and coming close to his level either).

Overall, a little disappointing and lacks oomph but is entertaining and atmospheric enough. 8/10 Bethany Cox


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