Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 128 items   « Prev | Next »


‘Watchmen’: Why The Length of the HBO Series Will Affect the Story

3 hours ago

[Editor’s note: Mild spoilers for the graphic novel “Watchmen,” written by Alan Moore and drawn by Dave Gibbons, below.]

It begins: The build-up to what could be HBO’s next landmark television event. In a photo posted to Instagram, “The Leftovers” showrunner Damon Lindelof announced that it was “Day One” — which HBO later confirmed meant that the writers’ room for his next project, an adaptation of the 1986 graphic novel “Watchmen,” was open:

According to an official statement from HBO, “HBO has committed to the pilot and back up scripts,” but details beyond that haven’t been made available.

However, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ iconic graphic novel, well known to comic book fans and connoisseurs of great storytelling alike, has enough of a legacy to inspire questions. The biggest question, of course: Will “Watchmen” be a limited series or an ongoing drama?

It’s become an increasingly complicated question of late, as it now seems possible that every TV show, no matter how theoretically close-ended, could potentially be rebooted or continued. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Vietnam War’: Ken Burns Reveals Why John McCain Wasn’t Interviewed for the Pow Section of the Documentary

3 hours ago

As “The Vietnam War” reaches its halfway point Thursday night with Episode 5, “This Is What We Do,” viewers will recognize a familiar face: John McCain. The Arizona senator is one of the most high-profile POWs during the Vietnam War, and his ordeal was brought back into the spotlight during the 2016 presidential campaign when Donald Trump said, “He is a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured.”

The PBS documentary will reveal just a fraction of the ordeal that McCain went through after he was shot down during a bombing mission over Hanoi in October 1967. As the son of Admiral McCain, John McCain was an important prisoner and therefore was also interviewed for television at that time. He underwent various beatings and tortures that have left him with lifelong health issues and disabilities.

Read More:‘The Vietnam War’ Review: Ken Burns’ Exhaustive Conflict Biography Shows »


- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Riverdale’ Star Kj Apa Involved in Car Crash; Show to Continue Production Uninterrupted

4 hours ago

The show must go on. “Riverdale” will continue production following star Kj Apa’s early-morning car crash, reports Deadline, and Warner Bros. Television has released a statement expressing how “extremely grateful” the studio is that the 20-year-old actor was unhurt. Apa, who plays Archie Andrews on the show, crashed into a lamp post while driving home and was tended to be medical personnel.

Read More:‘Sabrina the Teenage Witch’ Gets a Dark Coming-of-Age Horror Series From the Creators of ‘Riverdale

Here’s Wbtv’s full statement:

“First and foremost, we are extremely grateful that Kj Apa was uninjured during his recent accident. Secondarily, we want to specifically address the characterization that conditions on the set of ‘Riverdale’ are of concern. We have a large cast of series regulars, and our actors do not work every day. On the day of the accident, Kj worked 14.2 hours. The previous day he worked 2.5 hours, »


- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


Jean Rouch, Whose Films Inspired Godard, Receives Eight-Film DVD Box Set From Icarus — Watch

6 hours ago

Jean Rouch may not be a household name, but some of the world’s most revered filmmakers — from Jean-Luc Godard to Werner Herzog — are indebted to him. The French filmmaker pioneered the concept of “ethno-fiction,” fictional films built around the lives of everyday people, and developed the bulk of his filmography out of time spent in Africa. His 1958 feature “Moi, un Noir” follows the daily routine of a trio of Nigerian immigrants off the Ivory Coast who imagine themselves as movie stars, and its blend of jump cuts and amateur performances reportedly inspired Godard’s 1960 debut “Breathless.” Rouch’s documentary “Chronicle of a Summer,” co-directed with Edgar Morin, is considered a foundational achievement of the cinéma vérité movement.

Nevertheless, Rouch has remained a cinephile secret for decades, and in the wake of his death in 2004, much of his work has been unavailable in the U.S. — until now.

On November »


- Indiewire Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Mexico’s Permanencia Voluntaria Film Archive Damaged in Earthquake: ‘These Antique Film Reels Are Irreplaceable’

6 hours ago

The earthquake that struck Mexico on Tuesday affected every aspect of life in Mexico City and the surrounding area. That includes the Permanencia Voluntaria Film Archive, whose director has shared a letter detailing the damage done to one of Mexico’s most important cinematic institutions; in addition to movies, Permanencia Voluntaria houses posters, documents, and promotional materials that can’t be found anywhere else.

Read More:‘Narcos’ Location Scout Carlos Muñoz Portal Found Shot and Killed in Mexico

“We are a small town, our buildings are heavily damaged, and we lack the money, means, and manpower to repair the extensive damage wrought by the earthquake,” writes Viviana Garcia Besne, noting that local authorities have barred the archive’s employees from accessing the second floor and surveying the full extent of the damage. Baticine, the community movie theater managed by the archive, has also been destroyed.

Read More:Gael Garcia Bernal »


- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


The 25 Sexiest TV Scenes on Premium Cable of the Last 25 Years

6 hours ago

In the days before premium cable, television was a squeaky-clean place for the most part. The traditional networks rarely dared to push boundaries when it came to graphic sexual content for fear of pissing off advertisers. (And when they did, as with ABC’s “NYPD Blue,” affiliates and advertisers did indeed balk on cue.)

But then came HBO, Showtime, Cinemax, Starz, and a slew of other networks, which asked for a little extra subscriber cash, but offered in exchange unfiltered violence, language, and sex. Without that creative freedom, it’s doubtful that television as a storytelling art form would have evolved in the same way, especially when it comes to sex — one of the most primal aspects of humanity that the broadcast networks kept behind closed doors for far too long.

Because different things are sexy to different people, this list is unranked — streaming platforms and ad-supported cable networks will be saved for future lists. »


- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen, Steve Greene, Liz Shannon Miller and Michael Schneider

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Loveless’: Russia Chooses an Oscar Entry That Criticizes Its Society

7 hours ago

The question of how Russia’s Oscar committee would vote on its submission has been answered. Andrey Zvyaginstev’s Cannes jury prize-winner “Loveless” (Sony Pictures Classics) is the official entry. And it’s a movie that couldn’t be more critical of Russian society, which is portrayed as consumed by careerism, selfishness, greed, and even profound neglect of its own children. The movie was financed independent of the Russian film industry and government funding.

After the Academy overlooked Zvyagintsev’s film “Elena” in 2011 in favor of Oscar perennial and Russian film leader Nikita Mikalkhov’s “Burnt By the Sun 2,” Russia’s top auteur helped foment a revolution inside the Oscar committee. It underwent an overhaul following a press outcry about clandestine behind-the-scenes manipulations and a lack of transparency. Since then the committee has doubled in size, to about 25 filmmakers.

Read More:Cannes Review: In ‘Loveless,’ Russia Is the Place Where Families »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Rick and Morty’ Co-Creator Dan Harmon Denounces Fans Who Harassed Female Writers’: ‘I Loathe These People’

7 hours ago

Rick and Morty” now has gender parity in its writing room, which has unsurprisingly come as unwelcome news to a certain segment of the animated comedy’s audience. Jane Becker and Jessica Gao were reminded of this the hard — and all-too-common — way when they found themselves not only harassed but the victims of doxxers who leaked the two writers’ personal information online.

Rick and Morty” co-creator Dan Harmon spoke to Entertainment Weekly about the incident, calling it “disgusting” and thoroughly denouncing anyone and everyone involved: “It’s offensive to me as someone who was born male and white, and still works way harder than them, that there’s some white male [fan out there] trying to further some creepy agenda by ‘protecting’ my work.”

Read More:‘Rick and Morty’: 10 Reasons Why ‘Morty’s Mind Blowers’ is a Great Place to Start for New Viewers

“I was familiar going into the third season, »


- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


A New Animation Festival Launches, With Plans To Impact the Oscar Race

8 hours ago

Aiming to make an impact this Oscar season, the inaugural Animation Is Film Festival from GKids, the Annecy International Animation Festival, Variety, and Acifa-Hollywood launches October 20-22 at the Tcl Chinese 6 Theater.

The festival will present a selection of new animated feature films from Asia, Europe, South America, and North America, with juried and audience prizes and filmmakers attending most screenings. Additionally, the festival will feature studio events, special screenings, short film programs, and a Vr lounge.

Aif seems well timed: The Academy now allows all members to vote for animated features, using preferential voting. However, it remains to be seen what the dynamic will be in terms of mainstream versus indie nominees.

GKids, which has nine Oscar nominations (including this year’s “My Life as a Zucchini”), has seven movies in contention this season; four showcase in competition at Aif. The highlight is “The Breadwinner” (October 20), a coproduction of Ireland, »


- Bill Desowitz

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Twin Peaks’: 10 Behind-the-Scenes Photos to Help You Cope With the Series’ End

8 hours ago

For anyone who has been having troubling processing the fact that “Twin Peaks: The Return” is over, which could very well mean the end of the franchise as we know it, let the cast’s wonderful behind-the-scenes photos shine a light upon you. Kyle McLachlan, Sabrina Sutherland, and more have taken to social media in the weeks after that mind-blowing finale to share never-before-seen looks at “The Return” set, and man does David Lynch seem to be having the time of his life.

Read More:David Lynch Finally Shares His Thoughts on the ‘Twin Peaks’ Finale, Confirms Season 4 is Possible

Lynch has teased the possibility of continuing the series with Season 4, though nothing is confirmed. He joked that time is the biggest factor standing in his way, given it took over four years to write, direct, and edit “The Return.” The filmmaker is remaining ambiguous about the finale, telling »


- Zack Sharf

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Kingsman’ Director Matthew Vaughn Explains Why So Many Action Scenes Are Boring

8 hours ago

In an age where Hollywood is making fewer movies, they are also making bigger ones, with more explosive special effects. In the midst of what can feel like a CGI arms race, IndieWire has argued that big budget action scenes have become boring. “Kingsman 2: The Golden Circle” writer-director Matthew Vaughn agrees.

“I look at some action sequences and it’ll be like watching a football game and everything is on a mid-shot and shaking the camera around,” said Vaughn in an interview this week. “After a while, I’m thinking, this is really boring, I’m reading the impact but I’m not knowing where the ball is or who is winning, who is losing and how close [we are] to the end.”

Vaughn thinks the biggest problem is screenwriting 101: make sure the action is fully integrated into the narrative and the audience is emotionally invested in the action scenes. »


- Chris O'Falt

Permalink | Report a problem


‘mother!’: Darren Aronofsky Reacts to ‘F’ CinemaScore, Says ‘Some People Are Not Going to Want to Listen’

8 hours ago

“mother!” isn’t exactly cleaning up at the multiplex, not that Darren Aronofsky seems terribly let down. His enigmatic thriller scored a rare “F” from CinemaScore, a dubious badge of honor shared with movies both good (Steven Soderbergh’s “Solaris”) and bad (“I Know Who Killed Me”); the writer/director has responded to that failing grade on Kpcc’s the Frame, expressing neither surprise nor disappointment.

Read More:Paramount Defends ‘mother!’ Against Bad Box Office and ‘F’ CinemaScore: ‘This Movie is Brave’

Aronofsky, who most recently directed “Noah” and “Black Swan,” calls his movie a reflection of the way currently things are in the world — so of course it isn’t winning audiences over en masse. Here are his full comments:

“What’s interesting about that is, like, how if you walk out of this movie are you not going to give it an ‘F?’ It’s a punch. It’s a total punch. »


- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


Ain’t It Cool News Out as Fantastic Fest Sponsor After Devin Faraci Scandal: Harry Knowles Explains Why

8 hours ago

When Fantastic Fest kicks off today in Austin, it will open without at least one long-time supporter: the influential fan site Ain’t It Cool News has been dropped as a sponsor, and founder Harry Knowles will not be attending the festival. The move is the latest development in the still-unfurling Alamo Drafthouse controversy surrounding the re-hiring of former Birth.Movies.Death editor-in-chief Devin Faraci after he was accused of sexual assault last year.

Knowles confirmed the decision in a phone call with IndieWire today, adding that it seemed like the right thing to do, adding that Fantastic Fest co-founder Tim League would be sitting out the festival as well.

“I’m minding the store this time,” he said, noting that the site would have writers covering the festival. “I’ll be able to get stories up on time — silver linings, you know?”

Read More:Tim League Apologizes: ‘I Am Very Sorry. »


- Kate Erbland, Dana Harris and Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Friend Request’ Review: Horror Fans Might Swipe Right on This Tech-Driven Spookfest, Others Beware

8 hours ago

Social media has become a window into modern lives, but not an unfiltered one; users curate the way they appear online, often with disingenuous results. It was only a matter of time before the darker side of social media — cyber-stalking, online bullying, and slut-shaming — worked its way into the horror genre. While 2015’s “Unfriended” playfully exposed the double-lives of teenagers (with the majority of the film taking place on a computer screen), “Friend Request” is like unofficial sequel that focuses on the same themes.

But while the film uses social media as a catalyst for murder when a social pariah commits suicide, it does so with much muddier results.

Friend Request” limits the computer screen activity to an opening montage, which swims through Laura’s (Alycia Debnam-Carey) life via her Facebook feed: photos and videos of parties, dinners and drunken nights out with her friends, congratulatory posts about charity work, »


- Jamie Righetti

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Isle of Dogs’: 25 Striking Shots From Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Tale

9 hours ago

“Isle of Dogs” looks like a more than worthy follow-up to “Fantastic Mr. Fox.”

Related stories'Isle of Dogs' First Trailer: Wes Anderson Returns With An Original Stop-Motion Adventure'Rushmore' Accompanied by Smash Mouth, Blink 182, and Other '90s Bands Is as Hilariously Awful as You'd Imagine -- Watch'Super Troopers 2' Release Date Revealed, While Wes Anderson's 'Isle of Dogs' Moves Earlier »


- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Sinner’: The 13 Craziest and Depraved Differences Between the Book and USA’s Disturbing Series

9 hours ago

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the finale of USA Network’s “The Sinner” in addition to the book on which it was based.]

USA Network’s “The Sinner” became one of the surprise hits of the summer for its fascinating look at how hidden and unresolved traumas can manifest in disturbing or downright horrifying ways. The psychologically twisted story delved deeply into the past of a woman who seemed relatively normal and happy, but whose abuse at the hands of multiple people eventually led to her murdering a man without apparent provocation.

German crime author Petra Hammesfahr penned the 1999 novel on which “The Sinner” is based, and for the most part the central mysteries remained the same in both versions. The television adaptation naturally also had the expected number of cosmetic changes: Cora Bender is now Cora Tannetti, a song played on a cassette tape now plays on a phone, and the setting has moved from Germany to a small city in New York.

Read More:‘The Sinner’ Finale: Creator on What Season »


- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Woodshock’ Review: Kirsten Dunst Is Way Too High on Her Own Supply in First Movie from Fashion Icons Rodarte

9 hours ago

The debut feature from fashion luminaries Kate and Laura Mulleavy (of Rodarte fame), “Woodshock” begins with an agonized weed dispensary worker rolling a joint, lacing it with poison, and lighting it up for her terminally ill mother. Pot is legal in California, but dying with dignity is not, and so this sort of thing has to be done on the sly. Theresa (Kirsten Dunst) is devastated that it has to be done at all — and disturbed by her role in facilitating it — but she can’t bear to leave her mom in such pain.

The corpse isn’t even cold before Theresa begins to break down. Grief always carries the trimmings of psychosis, but this is something else — she’s not just mourning, she’s practically living a Polanski film. And things don’t really get any better for her after she’s responsible for a mix-up at the office »


- David Ehrlich

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Blade Runner 2049’: 7 Things You Need to Know Before Seeing Denis Villeneuve’s Sequel

9 hours ago

Blade Runner 2049” is gearing up for release on October 6, and with it comes 35 years of expectations and anticipation from die-hard fans of Ridley Scott’s iconic original. The film’s marketing has done a solid job at preserving spoilers and selling the movie’s jaw-dropping visuals, so all that’s left is for audiences to show up and be amazed at whatever Denis Villeneuve has in store.

Read More:Jared Leto Went So Method for ‘Blade Runner 2049’ That He Blinded Himself During Filming

The director has assembled an enviable cast and crew, which combines franchise stalwarts and newcomers alike. If Villeneuve can stay true to the original atmosphere while crafting a unique adventure, he should have no problem making “Blade Runner 2049” just as much of a sci-fi classic for this generation as “Blade Runner” was for the last.

Here’s everything you need to know about the sequel before seeing it. »


- Zack Sharf

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Cielo’ Trailer: Awe-Inspiring Nyff Documentary Premiere Reaches for the Heavens — Watch

9 hours ago

Innovative documentary filmmaker Alison McAlpine is back in the indie film fold, nearly a decade after her impressive “nonfiction ghost story” short film “Second Sight” debuted in 2008. This time around, McAlpine is again gunning for distinct filmmaking, now trained literally to the heavens.

In her “Cielo,” McAlpine is focused on the skies above the Andes and the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, which will debut at the New York Film Festival next month. Details on the film are purposely slim, but its official Nyff page explains that “McAlpine keeps the vast galaxies above and beyond in a delicate balance with the earthbound world of people, gently alighting on the desert- and mountain-dwelling astronomers, fishermen, miners, and cowboys who live their lives with reverence and awe for the skies,” adding that the film “itself is an act of reverence and awe, and its sense of wonder ranges from the intimate and »


- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Peter Rabbit’ Trailer: Beatrix Potter’s Beloved Kids’ Book Bunny Gets a Naughty New Origin Story — Watch

10 hours ago

Here’s what you know about Peter Rabbit, even if you don’t think you know anything about the beloved Beatrix Potter creation: he’s bad, but because he’s a cute little bunny, he’s also good. The star of Potter’s many tales about a darling family of anthropomorphic garden dwellers is now the recipient of his very own hybrid origin story, one that features no less than James Corden voicing the fluffy bunny. And no, he’s still not wearing any pants.

In “Peter Rabbit,” Sony Pictures Animation’s “irreverent, contemporary comedy with attitude” about the little dude, Peter’s long-standing feud with Mr. McGregor (Domhnall Gleeson, who seems to be hellbent on dominating the space of “beloved kid lit classics, reinvented for the big screen” these days) takes on a new dimension when the pair battle over a charming new neighbor (Rose Byrne), who apparently also adores animals. »


- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 128 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners